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C88 - The Homebrew CPU inspired by the SSEM [Permalink]

This is a post I needed to get around to doing for a while. This is about a CPU that I designed and then wrote in VHDL. It is meant to be a little like the Small Scale Experimental Machine (SSEM, more commonly known as the Manchester Baby).

I find I am still not very good at making videos but here is a quick intro:

All of the VHDL code is on github.
The simulator app is also hosted on github and has programming documentation.
You can generate a link to a program too so you can share it with other people.

I estimate that this project cost me about £120 in total (That's GBP, it's roughly $190 USD if it helps you).

A funny story I forgot to mention in the video;

I'm a member of York Hackspace, we were all going to the UK Maker faire in Newcastle (which was great fun as usual) to show off some projects (mainly Spacehack). Another member, Bob, persuaded me to take this computer along a few days before. It didn't have all of the features it has now, it was an earlier incarnation. Back then the papilio was just bolted to the lid. The unfortunate thing was that we were in an area of the building that had a very strange kind of flooring which seemed to be designed to build up a static charge in anyone that walks on it. All day we were sparking between ourselves and various other earthed items, experiencing the usual discomfort of such sudden [and unexpected] sparks. But half way through the day, Bob touched to top of the bolt that was holding the papilio to the lid. There was a spark. There was the death of a papilio. It must have been a fairly significant charge, it didn't just kill the papilio, it also killed the 8x8 LED matrix board. It's actually fairly impressive.

To this day Bob avoids touching the C88, when he can, for fear of his own (and I quote) "lightning bolt Sith powers".

Some pictures

As always, click any image to enlarge.

C88

C88

C88

C88

C88

C88

C88

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